What Erica Has On Hold

To Download

Over Sea, Under Stone by Susan Cooper because I had someone tell me they were his favorites from childhood and I’d never heard of them.
To Provence with Love by T.A. Williams because I am all about everything France.
Swing Time by Zadie Smith because a coworker told me she thought I’d identify strongly with it.
Second Star to the Right by Mary Alice Monroe because Peter Pan.
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho because my friend said she loved it and I haven’t read it.
The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande because I’m all about lists.
Give and Take by Adam Grant because it’s about giving and I’m a huge fan of Grant.
Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue because Oprah said so.
My Life With Bob by Pamela Paul because book about books.
The Radium Girls by Kate Moore because women in science.
The Princess Saves Herself in This One by Amanda Lovelace because female empowerment.
The Jane Austen Project by Kathleen A. Flynn because Jane Austen and sci-fi.
The Liberal Redneck Manifesto by Trae Crowder because I’m curious.
The Death and Life of the Great Lakes by Dan Egan because I grew up a stone’s throw from Ontario and I wish we cared for these amazing ecosystems as we should.
The Rules Do No Apply by Ariel Levy
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon because movie and good press and I read The Sun Is Almost a Star and it was pretty good.
Word by Word by Kory Stamper because words.
Blockade Billy by Stephen King because it’s short and about baseball and I’ve never actually read it.

In Print

Beartown by Fredrik Backman because I like his other stuff.
Whereas by Layli Long Soldier because Native American poetry.
White Working Class by Joan C. Williams because I read White Trash and am just on a jaunt on that subject.

Picture books Blue Sky White Stars by Sarvinder Naberhaus, The Banana-leaf Ball by Katie Milway, This is Edinburgh by Miroslav Sasek, and Sea Otter Heroes by Patricia Newman because they looked interesting and also ‘merica, play, otters, and Scotland.

Unstoppable by Bill Nye

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Originally published in: 2015

What it’s about: Everybody’s favorite television scientist has some solutions to global warming.

What made me pick it up: I spent many a morning in my younger years entranced by Bill Nye and his entertaining scientific antics. I was moving books in this section of the library when I found this and took it home.

My favorite things: This book really packs a punch. Nye isn’t condemning anyone, he’s more here to cheer us on to greater scientific breakthroughs regarding energy usage and encourage us to take simple steps to reduce our usage. He makes it sound easy and doable and, more important than anything, extremely urgent. I snapped many pics during my reading and texted them to friends. This book is a must-read if you feel like there is nothing you can do, or not enough being done, about climate change.

Who it’s great for: Environmentalists. Concerned citizens. Homeowners who want to start small to make change. Bill Nye fans from way back.

Erica’s rating: four-shells


Find this book on Amazon (affiliate link) or in your local library.


 

The Darkest Dark by Chris Hadfield

darkOriginally published in: 2017

What it’s about: Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield as a young boy who wants to travel to space, but is afraid of the dark.

What made me pick it up: I’m a huge fan of Hadfield. He was so informative and entertaining while in space, and he is such a supporter of science and humanity now that he’s back on the ground. I highly recommend his great TED talk.

My favorite things: I got this as an ebook with narration read by the author, so I got to have it read to me which made it even more fun. I really enjoyed the all-too-familiar kid who is afraid of the dark storyline and how he realizes he’ll have to face that fear to go into space like he dreamed when he grows up. It’s a simple, sweet story.

Who it’s great for: Fans of Hadfield. Kids who dream of being astronauts. Littles afraid of the dark.

Erica’s rating: four-shells


Find this book on Amazon (affiliate link) or in your local library.


 

Binti by Nnedi Okorafor

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Originally published in: 2015

What it’s about: A sci-fi novella about a teen named Binti – the first of her people to attend a prestigious interstellar university and the struggles she faces getting there.

What made me pick it up: I saw John Green mention the next book Binti: Home on Twitter. A highly recommended sci-fi novella? Sign me up!

My favorite things: This 2016 Nebula Award and 2016 Hugo Award winner for best novella has a quick pace and excellent world building. It will keep you entertained through all of its extraterrestrial escapades. I really enjoyed the character of Binti – she’s full of ingenuity and spunk. It ended on just the right note and now I am eagerly awaiting my holding coming in on the next book. Also, shout out to my alma mater where this author currently teaches.

Who it’s great for: Sci-fi fans. Readers who enjoy a strong female protagonist. Anyone looking for a captivating, but quick, read.

Erica’s rating: four-shells


Find Binti and Binti: Home at Amazon(affiliate links), or look for them in your local library.