Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

 

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Originally published: 2017

What it’s about: A modern southern gothic story set in a contemporary rural Mississippi Gulf Coast community chronicling a family’s struggles with poverty, addiction, incarceration, and the ghosts of past injustices.

What made me pick it up: I read Ward’s early novel Salvage the Bones last year and was excited to pick up her newest work.

My favorite things: Sing, Unburied, Sing is beautifully written and almost painful to read from the first page. The climax, however inevitable, left me stunned and heartbroken – but I’m here for it. The saddest parts of Ward’s stories don’t feel like cheap shots or emotional manipulation the way writing sometimes comes across. Instead, it feels honest and necessary. I love the way she seamlessly incorporates ghosts and spirits into the fabric of this family’s life.

Who it’s great for: Southern gothic readers; fans of Beloved.

Abby’s rating: four-and-a-half-shells


Get this book on Amazon or at your local library.


 

White Working Class by Joan C. Williams

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Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: A very astute explanation of the reasons for the class divide among white voters in America and how it can be bridged.

What made me pick it up: I had read White Trash and was intrigued by this one which seemed to be similar in theme, if not scope.

My favorite things: I appreciated Williams even-handed explanation of this divide and very easy to understand explanations of how and why the White Working Class votes. As someone who grew up smack in the middle of a WWC area I saw firsthand a lot of these beliefs and behaviors demonstrated both pre- and post-election in 2016. For those without a thorough upbringing or understanding of these folks this is a great read. More than anything I identify strongly with her plea that we pursue social and economic opportunity for all — which will work to alleviate issues besides class problems, like sexism and racism (to a point).

Who it’s great for: Readers looking to understand working class Americans and why their actions don’t always mesh with their interests. Anyone who needs a reminder that we’re all in this together, or at least we should be. You. READ IT.

Erica’s rating: five-shells


Find this in your local library or on Amazon.


 

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

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Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: A teen girl watches her oldest friend as he is murdered by the police. She contemplates Tupac’s concept of THUG LIFE (The Hate U Give Little Infants F***s Everyone) while struggling to stand up for her community.

What made me pick it up: This has been getting crazy good press so I scooped it up as soon as I could.

My favorite things: Starr’s voice is genuine and her heartbreak palpable. Thomas captures the essence and urgency of the Black Lives Matter movement without exploiting or forgetting the real lives that have been lost. The current movement is tied to the past through more than Tupac’s words; reminiscent of the response by Bloods and Crips to the Rodney King verdict, local opposing gangs band together to protect their communities and join in protest against the violence they face at the hands of the state. The overall effect is both breathtaking and devastating.

Who it’s great for: Teens and adults looking to understand and process the violence faced by communities of color in our society.

Abby’s rating: five-shells


Pick up a copy of this book at Amazon (affiliate link) or in your local library.

You Can’t Touch My Hair by Phoebe Robinson

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Originally published in: 2016

What it’s about: Phoebe Robinson reflects on her experiences as a black woman in comedy and on her observations about race and gender. She challenges her readers to do better.

What made me pick it up: This one has been making the rounds at work so I’ve had it on my TBR list for a while.

My favorite things: Robinson easily discusses race and gender in a way that is both accessible and unapologetic. Her sharp wit is so compelling that you can’t help but laugh even if what she’s calling out is you or something you do. I appreciate that she writes the same way she talks – with a lot of unnecessary abbreviations. Although, I’m not sure I agree with her spelling of cazsh (casual).

Who it’s great for: Fans of her stand-up or her podcasts, Sooo Many White Guys and 2 Dope Queens. Readers looking for humor with depth and purpose.

Abby’s rating: three-and-a-half-shells


Want a copy? Find one at Amazon (affiliate link) or see if it’s available at a library near you.