Evicted by Matthew Desmond

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Originally published in: 2016

What it’s about: A firsthand account of how eviction exacerbates extreme poverty.

What made me pick it up: Bill Gates said it was one of the best books he read in 2017.

My favorite things: I learned so much about the inequalities in housing, the callousness of slum lords, and the huge impact an eviction can have on all areas of your life. Reading about how owning poor quality inner city apartment buildings is a cash cow whether your tenants stay or leave was disgusting. This book is told in stories, which makes it all the more accessible. Sure a treatise on unfair housing practices would’ve been informative, but it wouldn’t have been this visceral. You will react physically to some of the horrible living situations subjects find themselves in and with horror that we, as a society, do not help them find better. I liked all of the personal stories, even if they were heartbreaking. I appreciate the author’s ability to maintain objectivity, for the most part, but don’t think I have the stomach to do spend years watching these small personal tragedies unfold while only providing a small amount of assistance. Desmond makes a compelling argument, based on extensive research, that we could fund a voucher system that would alleviate this problem and put us on par with many other developed and even developing nations in providing a leg up to our poorest citizens if only we would reallocate some money. In short, BY NOT SPENDING ANYTHING MORE we could fix the horrible, demoralizing situations you will read about in this book. How can we do anything other?

Who it’s great for: Everyone. Especially those interested in poverty and its mysterious persistence in extremely wealthy America.

Erica’s rating: five shells


Find this book in your local library or get in on Amazon (affiliate link).


 

The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein

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Originally published in: 2017

What’s it about: A thorough history of the ways in which the government – local, state, and federal -created and has maintained segregated communities in the United States.

What made me pick it up: A colleague read this and recommended it.

My favorite things: Rothstein is incredibly thorough. He delivers a lot of informative content in an accessible way and uses a lot of evidence to back up his claims. There is a FAQ section at the end where he addresses questions that might still linger.

Who it’s great for:  Readers interested in racial justice. Those interested in US history, discrimination, housing law, or civil rights. I’d recommend reading it with Desmond’s Evicted.

Abby’s rating: four shells


Find this in your local library or on Amazon (affiliate link).