Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

 

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Originally published: 2017

What it’s about: A modern southern gothic story set in a contemporary rural Mississippi Gulf Coast community chronicling a family’s struggles with poverty, addiction, incarceration, and the ghosts of past injustices.

What made me pick it up: I read Ward’s early novel Salvage the Bones last year and was excited to pick up her newest work.

My favorite things: Sing, Unburied, Sing is beautifully written and almost painful to read from the first page. The climax, however inevitable, left me stunned and heartbroken – but I’m here for it. The saddest parts of Ward’s stories don’t feel like cheap shots or emotional manipulation the way writing sometimes comes across. Instead, it feels honest and necessary. I love the way she seamlessly incorporates ghosts and spirits into the fabric of this family’s life.

Who it’s great for: Southern gothic readers; fans of Beloved.

Abby’s rating: four-and-a-half-shells


Get this book on Amazon or at your local library.


 

Every Body Yoga by Jessamyn Stanley

every body yoga

Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: An unintimidating guide to getting started with yoga for people of all shapes, sizes, backgrounds, and abilities.

What made me pick it up: Stanley is something of an Instagram star, so I was curious to see what she’d have to say to reluctant would-be yogis.

My favorite things: Part guide for the reluctant yogi, part memoir, Stanley openly shares her own complicated history with yoga to make it more accessible to anybody that’s been afraid to try because they don’t think that they will be capable. She’s so inspiring and encouraging that I, who have always had trouble with the quiet and introspective aspects of yoga, found myself anxious to give it another shot. She also includes several sequences for feelings that it’s easy to identify with, such as I Need To Chill the F Out (pg 206) and  I Need to Love Myself (pg 212).

Who it’s great for: Anyone who’s considered practicing yoga but been too intimidated to start.

Abby’s rating: five-shells


Find this book at Amazon or in your local library.


 

Everyone’s a Aliebn When Ur a Aliebn Too by Jomny Sun

aliebn
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Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: Jomny, a lonely alien, is sent to Earth to study humans in this charming graphic novel. Instead, he encounters a variety of Earth’s creatures and, through their humanity, learns some of life’s biggest lessons.

What made me pick it up: When I saw the word aliebn on a book spine I thought my fever brain was playing tricks on me, but after I took a closer look I needed to know more about these aliebns.

My favorite things: It was adorable, funny, poignant, and smart. Each of the creatures Jomny meets teaches him something new about what it means to be an individual and still be part of a community. Like the story, the art is simple but compelling. I especially enjoyed the endpapers of the book, which contained a log Jomny keeps of his adventures on Earth as well as his charming interpretations of each interaction.

Who it’s great for: If you loved The Giving Tree but also love The Oatmeal, this book is for you.

Abby’s rating: four-and-a-half-shells


Find this title at Amazon or in your local library.


 

Hunger by Roxane Gay

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Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: Roxane Gay reflects on her life in her body. She explores struggles with size, eating disorders, assault, and what it’s like to exist in a world that wasn’t designed to accommodate your body.

What made me pick it up: I love Roxane Gay’s work and I thought this book sounded important.

My favorite things: Take a deep breath before you dive into this because it is deep, raw, and painfully honest. She doesn’t shy away from details of her assault or the ways she thinks of her assailant to this day. She even takes the time to explain why she’s more comfortable identifying as a victim of sexual violence rather than as a survivor – without condemning or questioning those who do identify as survivors. The courage and openness throughout Hunger is consistently inspiring.

Who it’s great for: Fans of Roxane Gay’s other work. Memoir readers looking for something heavy to dig into.

Abby’s rating: five-shells


Find this book at Amazon or in your local library.


 

Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg and Nell Scovell

lean in

Originally published in: 2013

What it’s about: COO of Facebook Sheryl Sandberg considers her own experiences and gives advice for women on investing fully in career and life. You can also read Erica’s review of Sandberg’s later book Option B.

What made me pick it up: I’ve been meaning to check it out for a while and the audiobook was available to check out.

My favorite things: Some will argue that this is geared only toward certain women, but Sandberg does a great job of identifying her own privileges and trying to adapt her advice to women who may not have the same opportunities. She also encourages women to fully commit to whatever decisions they make even if they aren’t the same ones she would make.

Who it’s great for: Women looking for advice on career and life or insight into one woman’s rise to the top. Readers who enjoyed Sandberg’s later book, Option B.

Abby’s rating: three-shells


Find this book at Amazon or in your local library.


 

Lowriders to the Center of the Earth by Cathy Camper

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Originally published in: 2016

What it’s about: In this second book of the Lowriders in Space series, three friends close their garage and journey to the center of the earth to rescue their cat, Genie, from Mitlantecuhtli the Aztec god of the underworld.

What made me pick it up: This was recommended and lent to me by a coworker.

My favorite things: Camper’s liberal use of Spanish vocabulary (with translation in footnotes and a glossary at the end of the book) adds depth to the story. The translations appear after only the first time each Spanish word appears and I appreciated the assumption that the readers are capable of learning terms that might be new to them. The art, making use of only blue, red, and black, is fun and engaging and has the feel of something that might have started as a (very impressive) doodle.

Who it’s great for: Tweens looking for a fun adventure with a bit of mythology thrown in the mix.

Abby’s rating: three-and-a-half-shells


Pick up a copy of this book at Amazon (affiliate link) or in your local library.


 

Books for Living by Will Schwalbe

Originally published in: 2016

What it’s about: A list of books that the author feels will help you live better.

What made me pick it up: I had read Schwalbe’s first book, The End of Your Life Book Club, and enjoyed it so I picked this up.

My favorite things: As a librarian I am always interested in what books other people enjoy reading. This list is highly engaging and definitely added titles to my to-read pile. I like how he matched each book to a life lesson it helped him with, and teases just enough of a book to make you want to go pull it off the shelf and see for yourself.

Who it’s great for: Fans of Schwalbe. Book lovers. Those who enjoy books about books. Anyone curious about what someone else likes to read.

Erica’s rating: four-shells


Find The End of Your Life Book Club and Books for Living on Amazon (affiliate links) or at your local library.


Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier

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Originally published in: 2016

What it’s about: Catrina struggles to adjust as her family moves to better accommodate her younger sister’s chronic illness. Their new community’s enthusiasm for ghosts and Día de Muertos is at once scary and a good opportunity to connect with their mother’s Mexican heritage.

What made me pick it up: I saw this on a colleague’s desk and needed to read it immediately.

My favorite things: In her latest book, Telgemeier successfully takes on a difficult topic and makes it more accessible and less scary. Her art and storytelling are as compelling as ever and make Ghosts difficult to put down even once.

Who it’s great for: Telgemeier’s devoted following will already know about this, but it’s a great choice for any tweens interested in graphic novels. This is also a great choice for those coping with chronic illness in one of their loved ones.

Abby’s rating: four-shells


Want a copy? Find one at Amazon (affiliate link) or see if it’s available at a library near you.