Patina by Jason Reynolds


Originally published: 2017

What it’s about: A young teen girl dealing with a new school and a new family situation while finding her place on a new track team.

What made me pick it up: I’ve been wanting to read something by this author for a while. When I saw this audio was available I placed a hold.

My favorite parts: As a former track runner I enjoyed the depictions of how important running is for a runner, as well as how much it is a team sport even though it seems so individualistic. Made me want to run a relay again. I also enjoyed how much this was a just a plain every day story about a regular girl and her situation and how she is dealing with it. It was incredibly authentic both in relationships and experiences.

Who it’s great for: Older chapter book readers looking for a good, but realistic, story. Those looking for proof that you can come through any situation. Runners and wannabe runners.

Erica’s rating:


Find this book on Amazon(affiliate link) or in your local library.


 

Every Body Yoga by Jessamyn Stanley

every body yoga

Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: An unintimidating guide to getting started with yoga for people of all shapes, sizes, backgrounds, and abilities.

What made me pick it up: Stanley is something of an Instagram star, so I was curious to see what she’d have to say to reluctant would-be yogis.

My favorite things: Part guide for the reluctant yogi, part memoir, Stanley openly shares her own complicated history with yoga to make it more accessible to anybody that’s been afraid to try because they don’t think that they will be capable. She’s so inspiring and encouraging that I, who have always had trouble with the quiet and introspective aspects of yoga, found myself anxious to give it another shot. She also includes several sequences for feelings that it’s easy to identify with, such as I Need To Chill the F Out (pg 206) and  I Need to Love Myself (pg 212).

Who it’s great for: Anyone who’s considered practicing yoga but been too intimidated to start.

Abby’s rating: five-shells


Find this book at Amazon or in your local library.


 

Everyone’s a Aliebn When Ur a Aliebn Too by Jomny Sun

aliebn
This post contains affiliate links.

Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: Jomny, a lonely alien, is sent to Earth to study humans in this charming graphic novel. Instead, he encounters a variety of Earth’s creatures and, through their humanity, learns some of life’s biggest lessons.

What made me pick it up: When I saw the word aliebn on a book spine I thought my fever brain was playing tricks on me, but after I took a closer look I needed to know more about these aliebns.

My favorite things: It was adorable, funny, poignant, and smart. Each of the creatures Jomny meets teaches him something new about what it means to be an individual and still be part of a community. Like the story, the art is simple but compelling. I especially enjoyed the endpapers of the book, which contained a log Jomny keeps of his adventures on Earth as well as his charming interpretations of each interaction.

Who it’s great for: If you loved The Giving Tree but also love The Oatmeal, this book is for you.

Abby’s rating: four-and-a-half-shells


Find this title at Amazon or in your local library.


 

Last Stop On Market Street by Matt De La Peña

market

Originally published in: 2015

What it’s about: A young boy and his grandma taking the bus through their city.

What made me pick it up: I actually got a few pages into this a year or so ago but didn’t get to finish it. When I saw it available in our Overdrive collection I checked it out.

My favorite things: This has vibrant illustrations and a powerful message of community. I liked the grandmother’s openness to all the people around them and how that rubbed off on her grandson. It is a simple, beautiful story.

Who it’s great for: Littles who want things they can’t afford. Anyone seeking a story of community. Readers who try to find beauty wherever they look.

Erica’s rating: four-shells


Find this book on Amazon (affiliate link) or in your local library.


 

Hunger by Roxane Gay

hunger

Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: Roxane Gay reflects on her life in her body. She explores struggles with size, eating disorders, assault, and what it’s like to exist in a world that wasn’t designed to accommodate your body.

What made me pick it up: I love Roxane Gay’s work and I thought this book sounded important.

My favorite things: Take a deep breath before you dive into this because it is deep, raw, and painfully honest. She doesn’t shy away from details of her assault or the ways she thinks of her assailant to this day. She even takes the time to explain why she’s more comfortable identifying as a victim of sexual violence rather than as a survivor – without condemning or questioning those who do identify as survivors. The courage and openness throughout Hunger is consistently inspiring.

Who it’s great for: Fans of Roxane Gay’s other work. Memoir readers looking for something heavy to dig into.

Abby’s rating: five-shells


Find this book at Amazon or in your local library.


 

Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg and Nell Scovell

lean in

Originally published in: 2013

What it’s about: COO of Facebook Sheryl Sandberg considers her own experiences and gives advice for women on investing fully in career and life. You can also read Erica’s review of Sandberg’s later book Option B.

What made me pick it up: I’ve been meaning to check it out for a while and the audiobook was available to check out.

My favorite things: Some will argue that this is geared only toward certain women, but Sandberg does a great job of identifying her own privileges and trying to adapt her advice to women who may not have the same opportunities. She also encourages women to fully commit to whatever decisions they make even if they aren’t the same ones she would make.

Who it’s great for: Women looking for advice on career and life or insight into one woman’s rise to the top. Readers who enjoyed Sandberg’s later book, Option B.

Abby’s rating: three-shells


Find this book at Amazon or in your local library.


 

The Storied Life of AJ Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

IMG_2848.JPG

Originally published in: 2014

What it’s about: A widowed bookseller approaching middle age finds himself suddenly tasked with taking care of an orphaned baby girl.

What made me pick it up: This author was on the long list of possible invitees to our wonderful hometown book festival but I didn’t recognize her name so I checked what she had written, realized I hadn’t read it, and grabbed it off the shelf that day.

My favorite things: This book was a quick and pleasant read. I liked the relationship building and the mild and predictable plot twists. The characters were also enjoyable. It has a mild grumpy old man factor, but since he’s only in his late 30s when the book begins I don’t think it quite qualifies as one of those books. More than anything it reminded me of Mitch Albom’s writings – how a character is supported and affected by a web of surrounding factors and characters he knows nothing bout, but we as readers do.

Who it’s great for: Fans of Mitch Albom or Fredrik Backman. Lovers of grumpy old man lit. Readers who enjoy small town novels with sweet stories and neatly wrapped up, hope filled endings.

Erica’s rating: three-and-a-half-shells


Find this book on Amazon (affiliate link) or in your local library.


 

Unstoppable by Bill Nye

IMG_2825.JPG

Originally published in: 2015

What it’s about: Everybody’s favorite television scientist has some solutions to global warming.

What made me pick it up: I spent many a morning in my younger years entranced by Bill Nye and his entertaining scientific antics. I was moving books in this section of the library when I found this and took it home.

My favorite things: This book really packs a punch. Nye isn’t condemning anyone, he’s more here to cheer us on to greater scientific breakthroughs regarding energy usage and encourage us to take simple steps to reduce our usage. He makes it sound easy and doable and, more important than anything, extremely urgent. I snapped many pics during my reading and texted them to friends. This book is a must-read if you feel like there is nothing you can do, or not enough being done, about climate change.

Who it’s great for: Environmentalists. Concerned citizens. Homeowners who want to start small to make change. Bill Nye fans from way back.

Erica’s rating: four-shells


Find this book on Amazon (affiliate link) or in your local library.


 

Words in a French Life by Kristin Espinasse

french.png

Originally published in: 2006

What it’s about: Former Arizonan and current ex-pat Espinasse tells about her foibles in her adopted land of Provence, especially with the language.

What made me pick it up: I am a lifelong Francophile and practice my ever-improving French daily. I tend to gather up any book about living in France that I can, and this one was no different. As soon as I found her blog and found out about this book I knew I had to have it.

My favorite things: This book is mostly in English with a spattering if French phrases sprinkled throughout and then translated either in text or at the end of each chapter. I enjoyed every aspect of this book, from its conversational tone to her slightly clumsy transition from American customs and language to French. She writes with candor and humor and in doing so you believe it just might be possible to move to France yourself and make your way there. In addition, she paints a beautiful picture of her new home region of Provence. You’ll want to visit and experience the sun and the sea and the wine that she talks about. It’s also just a really great peek into French life and how it is different from life here.

Who it’s great for: Francophiles. Anyone working on learning, and stumbling through, the French language.

Erica’s rating: four-shells


Find this book on Amazon (affiliate link) or in your local library.


 

Miss Crandall’s School for Young Ladies and Little Misses of Color by Elizabeth Alexander and Marilyn Nelson

 

IMG_2849

Originally published in: 2007

What it’s about: Poems and biographical notes tell the story of the first school for African American girls in Connecticut and the challenges it faced.

What made me pick it up: It was reviewed by a friend on Goodreads and I had never heard of either the book or the story of Prudence Crandall and her school. Thankfully the library had a copy so I ordered it in.

My favorite things: This book is written in poems and they give powerful snippets of both Crandall’s and the students’ experiences and the backlash they faced trying to get an education. They are difficult experiences which can be hard to read about but the authors work to not only tell the story but also impress upon readers why the students thought getting an education was important enough to risk it. The poems are accompanied by lovely illustrations.

Who it’s great for: Those looking for stories of African American history outside the usual characters.

Erica’s rating: four-shells


Find this book on Amazon (affiliate link) or in your local library.