There There by Tommy Orange

there there.jpg

Originally published in: 2018

What’s it about:  An exploration of identity, community, and meaning-making in contemporary Native life. Told through multiple perspectives, there is a focus on what it means to be, as Orange describes, an Urban Indian when the rest of the world believes the American Indian story exists only on reservations and in history books.

What made me pick it up: I read a few promising blurbs. It also has a page count under 300 and my attention span is short right now.

My favorite things: I tend to love stories told from multiple perspectives, and Orange does an incredible job of tying all of his varied characters’ lives together. He also brings in his own identity as an enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma to inform his characters’ experiences.

Who it’s great for:  People interested in contemporary Native American voices and experiences and readers of stories that complicate our understanding of identity and the world.

Abby’s rating: four shells


Find this in your local library or on Amazon (affiliate link).


 

Whereas by Layli Long Soldier


Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: Being American Indian in America, a country that doesn’t always respect that reality or treat it well.

What made me pick it up: I love poetry because it’s wonderful word play and brief (helpful if you, like me and Abby, are in a Goodreads competition). This being by an American Indian writer only made me more intrigued.

My favorite things: It’s difficult to put into words how this poetry affected me. Yes, it’s always good to be, even briefly, submersed in a culture that isn’t yours, but this… this is different. This is like a sucker punch. Every time. It’s wrenching and raw and you feel exposed as you witness an even more exposed writer. You viscerally experience her injustice. Her dualities and all her struggles. And you want to sincerely atone for everything that has happened to her people even though you know that is impossible. The damage is too great. I love poetry because it’s like math — it makes me focus, and think hard, and at the end be overcome with a sublime feeling of inspiration and awe because of the magic that appears on the page once you figure it out. I cannot recommend this enough.

Who it’s great for: Poetry fans. Anyone interested in American Indian history or experience.

Erica’s rating: five-shells


Find this book on Amazon (affiliate link) or in your local library.