Hand to Mouth by Linda Tirado

21944886

Originally published in: 2014

What it’s about: Being the working poor in America and the impossibilities of achieving the American dream that that presents.

What made me pick it up: I saw it recommended highly by one of my friends on Goodreads.

My favorite things: As someone who grew up relatively poor early on a lot of this was familiar and it was so nice to have someone vocalize it who wasn’t slumming for journalism or doctorate earning reasons. The profanity and giving of no fucks made me feel like I was around some individuals from my hometown in the best way. More than anything it will open eyes for how hardworking the poor are and how not enough is being done to assist them. Yes, assist them. We’re all humans. Let’s start acting like it.

Who it’s great for: Anyone living paycheck to (hopefully) paycheck who wants to feel understood and those who have the luxury not to be who want to understand.

Erica’s rating: four shells


Find this book in your local library or on Amazon (affiliate link).


 

Lighter Than My Shadow by Katie Green

lighter than my shadow

Originally published in: 2013

What’s it about: A personal memoir of surviving and recovering from an eating disorder and abuse.

What made me pick it up: I love graphic memoirs and find they are a great medium for exploring personal traumas

My favorite things: Green is achingly honest and relatable. Her art is both lovely and despondent. She sheds light on the reality that eating disorders are about more than food and that not all are textbook cases.

Who it’s great for:  Readers struggling to understand mental illness in someone they love.

Abby’s rating: five-shells


Find this in your local library or on Amazon (affiliate link).


 

The Nature Fix by Florence Williams

41i8igws0sl-_sx327_bo1204203200_

Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: How spending as little as 30 minutes a week in nature can help us be happier.

What made me pick it up: I’m a nature girl. I grew up running through orchards and living outside in our yard. My favorite pastimes reinforce what this book tells me is true — nature helps. More of it is better.

My favorite things: I love that she includes the research. I love that there is research that says we need more, not less, exposure to nature and that it can lead to all sorts of health benefits like less depression and ADHD. It might even be equal to or better than meditation! I enjoyed that she tells it as her personal journey to find out what works and why and how to incorporate more of it into her life. It makes me want to add “go for a walk in the trees” to my to do list and “end up somewhere wild” to my travel plans.

Who it’s great for: Nature enthusiasts of all stripes. Tree lovers. Walkers. People who feel a bit off and are looking for a solution.

Erica’s rating: four-and-a-half-shells


Find a copy in your local library or on Amazon (affiliate link).


 

I Can’t Breathe by Matt Taibbi

i cant breathe

Originally published in: 2017

What’s it about: The life, death, and legacy of Erica Garner – the man whose death at the hands of the Staten Island police made headlines with the release of a video of his dying words; “I can’t breathe.”

What made me pick it up: I was already thinking about reading this, but I made it my top priority after his daughter, Erica, passed away in late December.

My favorite things: Though at times it feels a bit voyeuristic, Taibbi dives deeply into the lives and histories of numerous people involved in or impacted by Garner’s death. He is very thorough in his reporting in order to paint a more complete picture of exactly how and why Eric Garner dies.

Who it’s great for:  True crime readers. Those interested in the human stories involved in racial profiling, police violence, and systemic discrimination.

Abby’s rating: three-shells


Find this in your local library or on Amazon (affiliate link).


 

Gold Fame Citrus by Claire Vaye Watkins

gold fame citrus

Originally published in: 2015

What’s it about: In the near future, much of the Southwestern United States has been engulfed by a growing sea of sand due to the effects of climate change and unsustainable water practices. Luz and Ray struggle to survive, do what’s right, and find hope in the desiccated land.

What made me pick it up: I heard about this on a podcast that I’ve been subscribing to for a while.

My favorite things: I’ve always know that the East coast is the right place to be, and this sealed the deal for me. Watkins’ tale of an uninhabitable Southwest is terrifyingly believable and a reminder of the impact we’re having on our world. It’s also a great story about the struggle to build and maintain relationships through adversity.

Who it’s great for:  Readers interested in speculative fiction and apocalyptic themes. Fans of Jenni Fagan’s The Sunlight Pilgrims and Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven.

Abby’s rating: four shells


Find this in your local library or on Amazon (affiliate link).


 

She Persisted by Chelsea Clinton

51crlmhxuvl-_sx258_bo1204203200_

Originally published in: 2017

What it’s about: A collected biography of some great female icons throughout history.

What made me pick it up: It seemed like a fitting book to kick off my 2018 reading with.

My favorite things: I liked that this profiled Claudette Colvin, who predated and inspired Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat. It’s always great to see women who are not the usual reference points for a specific time in history also get their stories told.

Who it’s great for: Everyone. Especially little girls who need role models from all walks of life.

Erica’s rating: four shells


Find this book on Amazon (affiliate link).


 

Notorious RBG by Irin Carmon

51r4tizes2bl-_sx258_bo1204203200_
This post contains affiliate links.

Originally published in: 2015

What it’s about: A biography of the most iconic female Supreme Court Justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

What made me pick it up: I had put The RBG Workout on hold and saw this was available, so I checked it out.

My favorite things: I love that RBG became a meme based on Biggie and then this excellent book was written about her as a result. I have always admired Ginsburg, but only in a general sense because I knew she was a woman who had infiltrated a man’s world at a time when that was still extremely difficult to do. This book provides so much information I never knew about her from her balanced and supportive marriage to her fitness regimen to her very reserved sense of humor. Now I also have a new goal to be able to do 20 pushups, like she can. I most enjoyed her view that the best change happens incrementally over time and that freedom for everyone should be the goal.

Who it’s great for: Everyone. Girls and women of all ages. But seriously, everyone.

Erica’s rating: four shells


Find this book in your local library or get in on Amazon.


 

The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein

color of law

Originally published in: 2017

What’s it about: A thorough history of the ways in which the government – local, state, and federal -created and has maintained segregated communities in the United States.

What made me pick it up: A colleague read this and recommended it.

My favorite things: Rothstein is incredibly thorough. He delivers a lot of informative content in an accessible way and uses a lot of evidence to back up his claims. There is a FAQ section at the end where he addresses questions that might still linger.

Who it’s great for:  Readers interested in racial justice. Those interested in US history, discrimination, housing law, or civil rights. I’d recommend reading it with Desmond’s Evicted.

Abby’s rating: four shells


Find this in your local library or on Amazon (affiliate link).