A Kind of Freedom by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton

a kind of freedom

Originally published in: 2017

What’s it about: A New Orleans-based family saga that traces the history of racial disparity from the days of Jim Crow through modern post-Katrina reality.

What made me pick it up: I saw that this got long-listed for the National Book Award in Fiction, and thought it sounded like a good compliment to Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing, which I really enjoyed (and which actually won the award).

My favorite things: While this doesn’t dip into the supernatural they way that Sing did, it still traces similar themes that I was hoping to find. Each character experiences specific manifestations of systemic racism unique to their era but undeniably tied to those of the other generations. The lines between each are clear, with the desperation escalating in younger characters. The people missing from each character’s life have almost as much of an impact on their stories as do those who are present.

Who it’s great for:  Fans of family histories that trace multiple generations. Readers looking for writers telling complex stories of the African-American family; fans of Jesmyn Ward, Tayari Jones, and Angela Flournoy.

Abby’s rating: four-shells


Find this in your local library or on Amazon (affiliate link).


 

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